In 1905, a Swedish immigrant by the name of Martis Jerk came to America from Dalarna, Sweden. He changed his name to Eric Carl Wickman when entering the country which was a common pracitce among immigrants at the time in fear of being labeled as a “foreigner.” He then dropped the first name of Eric and went simply by Carl Wickman.
In 1914, Carl Wickman was laid off from the Alice mine where he worked as a drill operator. In his free time, he noticed that many miners had a problem getting to and from work. An idea sprung up in his head that if he were to sell a vehicle that would be reasonably priced as well as effecient in getting the miners to and from work on time, he would not need to go back to the underground mines where it was often dangerous. So in 1914, Wickman became a salesman for the Hupmobile and also a partnership owner in the company. The Hupmobile never sold well.
In 1915, after seeing the failing sales of the seven passenger Hupmobile, he tried to show his clients what a great product the Hupmobile was by literally giving them rides to and from work for a cheap fifteen cents a ride. When he found out that giving the miners transportation was more profit producing, Wickman created the Mesaba Transportation Company. Carl Wickman did have a partner int his business that little is ever talked about named Andrew “Bus Andy” Anderson.
Three years after starting the company, Wickman was running 18 buses and was making $40,000. In 1922, He sold the company for $60,000.
In 1933, the company was formally named The Greyhound Corporation and was running nationally.
In 1954, Carl Wickman passed away and it made national headlines appearing in the New York Times in the February 6, 1954 edition.
Today, Hibbing is the home to the Greyhound Bus Origin Museum but that museum’s history is a story in itself which we will get to in a bit. The museum is believed to be located right on the original path that Wickman used to run his transit lines.
 Source: Greyhound Bus Origin Museum & Wikipedia; 1 & 2

In 1905, a Swedish immigrant by the name of Martis Jerk came to America from Dalarna, Sweden. He changed his name to Eric Carl Wickman when entering the country which was a common pracitce among immigrants at the time in fear of being labeled as a “foreigner.” He then dropped the first name of Eric and went simply by Carl Wickman.

In 1914, Carl Wickman was laid off from the Alice mine where he worked as a drill operator. In his free time, he noticed that many miners had a problem getting to and from work. An idea sprung up in his head that if he were to sell a vehicle that would be reasonably priced as well as effecient in getting the miners to and from work on time, he would not need to go back to the underground mines where it was often dangerous. So in 1914, Wickman became a salesman for the Hupmobile and also a partnership owner in the company. The Hupmobile never sold well.

In 1915, after seeing the failing sales of the seven passenger Hupmobile, he tried to show his clients what a great product the Hupmobile was by literally giving them rides to and from work for a cheap fifteen cents a ride. When he found out that giving the miners transportation was more profit producing, Wickman created the Mesaba Transportation Company. Carl Wickman did have a partner int his business that little is ever talked about named Andrew “Bus Andy” Anderson.

Three years after starting the company, Wickman was running 18 buses and was making $40,000. In 1922, He sold the company for $60,000.

In 1933, the company was formally named The Greyhound Corporation and was running nationally.

In 1954, Carl Wickman passed away and it made national headlines appearing in the New York Times in the February 6, 1954 edition.

Today, Hibbing is the home to the Greyhound Bus Origin Museum but that museum’s history is a story in itself which we will get to in a bit. The museum is believed to be located right on the original path that Wickman used to run his transit lines.

 Source: Greyhound Bus Origin Museum & Wikipedia; 12

Service to “Palo Alto”

Service to “Palo Alto”

The “Chicago Express”

The “Chicago Express”

Vintage Greyhound Driver Hat

Vintage Greyhound Driver Hat

Stephen Pryor Sr. - “We don’t just park these buses for people to look at…at Greyhound we cover lots of miles.”

Stephen Pryor Sr. - “We don’t just park these buses for people to look at…at Greyhound we cover lots of miles.”

#Gas

#Gas

Instrument panel on the 1931 Mack - Greyhound - “Nostalgia on Wheels”

Instrument panel on the 1931 Mack - Greyhound - “Nostalgia on Wheels”

Thousands of miles were logged in this seat.  The stories it could tell…

Thousands of miles were logged in this seat.  The stories it could tell…

1931 Mack - Greyhound Bus - Original everything!

1931 Mack - Greyhound Bus - Original everything!

"I’ve been homeless more ‘on’ than ‘off’ for the last 15 years.  This walker helps me take all my things with me when I leave the shelter, because you can’t leave anything there at all.  Sometimes I don’t feel like I get all the help they can give because I don’t look like I’m ‘homeless enough’".

"I’ve been homeless more ‘on’ than ‘off’ for the last 15 years.  This walker helps me take all my things with me when I leave the shelter, because you can’t leave anything there at all.  Sometimes I don’t feel like I get all the help they can give because I don’t look like I’m ‘homeless enough’".

Chills on a 90 degree day…

Chills on a 90 degree day…

A man behind me on the train says, “Don’t give her any money, I see her out here every day doing this scam.”   All I could say was, "It takes a lot of balls and humility to take your infant son on a metro train and beg for some loose change; scam or not." - I gave anyway.

A man behind me on the train says, “Don’t give her any money, I see her out here every day doing this scam.”   All I could say was, "It takes a lot of balls and humility to take your infant son on a metro train and beg for some loose change; scam or not." - I gave anyway.

Homelessness sometimes means you rest in the middle of your own living room, others be damned.

Homelessness sometimes means you rest in the middle of your own living room, others be damned.

Maybe we should all wear masks?

Maybe we should all wear masks?

"Hey America, it’s your money.  Spend it how you want."  Among other ramblings heard today on the Hill…

"Hey America, it’s your money.  Spend it how you want."  Among other ramblings heard today on the Hill…